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Buy Chow Chow Dog


  • Chows can live quite well in apartments as they are quiet and just require walks rather than needing a yard to run around in. "}},"@type": "Question","name": "Why is a chow chow dog's tongue blue?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Chow chows are born with typical pink tongues. The color of the tongue develops as the chow puppy begins to open its eyes. The tongue can turn blue, purple, or even black. As the chow matures, the tongue may turn back to pink. No one really knows why this happens, other than that the tongue of a chow chow contains extra pigmented cells much like pigmented skin cells. It helps to know that if your chow's tongue has pink spots in the middle of the color, it's likely not a purebred dog.","@type": "Question","name": "Is a chow chow a good breed for a first-time dog owner?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Yes and no. The chow chow may look like a big old teddy bear, but this somewhat large dog can be obstinate and tough for a first-time dog owner to train. However, it doesn't need a whole lot of exercise and can also have a quiet, reserved cat-like personality. But what can make them potentially a good choice for new owners is that they are generally even-tempered (with that streak of stubbornness)."]}]}] .icon-garden-review-1fill:#b1dede.icon-garden-review-2fill:none;stroke:#01727a;stroke-linecap:round;stroke-linejoin:round > buttonbuttonThe Spruce PetsNewslettersClose search formOpen search formSearch DogsGetting Started

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buy chow chow dog



Chow chows are born with typical pink tongues. The color of the tongue develops as the chow puppy begins to open its eyes. The tongue can turn blue, purple, or even black. As the chow matures, the tongue may turn back to pink. No one really knows why this happens, other than that the tongue of a chow chow contains extra pigmented cells much like pigmented skin cells. It helps to know that if your chow's tongue has pink spots in the middle of the color, it's likely not a purebred dog.


Yes and no. The chow chow may look like a big old teddy bear, but this somewhat large dog can be obstinate and tough for a first-time dog owner to train. However, it doesn't need a whole lot of exercise and can also have a quiet, reserved cat-like personality. But what can make them potentially a good choice for new owners is that they are generally even-tempered (with that streak of stubbornness).


At his biggest, the chow chow weighs upwards of 70 pounds and stands 20 inches tall at the shoulder. As big as he is, his poofy, regal-looking mane can make him appear even larger. A male chow puppy can weigh over 40 pounds by the time he's just 6 months old.


According to The Chow Club, Inc, the official breed club, they are generally reserved and like to keep to themselves, and are often described as "cat-like" in nature. While a well-socialized chow should never cause trouble, they can be standoffish and don't typically trust strangers. Maleah Allen, owner of D&M Farm Kennel, has been a chow chow breeder for more than 20 years and says the dog is sometimes misjudged as being aggressive.


The breed is smart yet strong-willed, and they will give a clear warning to anything they don't like. That being said, chows are highly loyal and have a deep love for their families. While they won't like being fussed over, they will latch onto and give attention to their favorite person.


The chow chow is a large dog breed, but that doesn't mean he's incapable of apartment living. In fact, because he doesn't require a lot of exercise, the chow can be very satisfied in an apartment. "They are the felines of the canine world. Very clean, very loyal without being socially needy," Allen says. "They are content to be with you, not on you." Chows are easily house trained and don't have a typical dog odor, making them one of the cleanest dog breeds.


"While they make loyal companions to their people, they withdraw from the chaos of young children," says Sarah Hodges, author, trainer and applied behaviorist with the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. The dignified chow chow doesn't have a lot of patience for rough play. If he's raised with kids, he will accept them, but may still be cautious around all chaos that comes with children.


Although they can adjust easily to being alone during the workday, chow chows will prefer to be near their humans when they get home. They don't do well being left outside. A chow can overheat easily if it's humid or sunny, and he should not spend a lot of time outdoors on hot days.


Both types of coats, rough and smooth, require regular grooming. Between grooming sessions, a chow will need to be brushed a few times a week to maintain a healthy coat and skin. Chow chows are very heavy shedders in the spring and fall when they blow their winter and summer coats. Otherwise, they shed minimally year-round and consistent brushing should prevent excess hair balls in the house. Regular teeth brushing will help prevent any oral health issues (and give you a close-up of that infamous blue tongue). If you can hear his nails clicking on the floor, they are too long and need to be trimmed.


Training a chow chow requires an owner with consistency. The proud chow can be very disciplined if behavior training begins at a young age, but it'll take some patience to fully gain his loyalty. With a history of hunting and guarding, chow chows are extremely dignified and feel they deserve the utmost respect. Consistent positive reinforcement will teach them right from wrong.


The chow's thick, fluffy coat and short snout also makes them more at risk for heat stroke, according to the CCCI. Keep them in the air conditioning during the summer months, and make sure they're always well-brushed so air is able to circulate to their skin.


Chow chows are one of the world's oldest breeds. Depictions of the fluffy canines can be seen in Han Dynasty artifacts as early as 206 BC, according to the CCCI. In the 8th century, a Chinese emperor was said to have kept 5,000 chows as hunting dogs, according to The Chow Chow Club. Chow chows were mainly used for hunting and guarding, as well as royal companions for nobility.


The breed went by multiple names (such as "black-tongue dog" or "bear dog") until British merchants acquired chow chows in the 18th century. The English expression 'chow chow' referred to miscellaneous items on trade ships that didn't fit into any other categories. The chow chow name stuck with the breed, which skyrocketed in popularity when Queen Victoria later took interest in them. The first chow chow to appear in an American dog show in 1809 won third place, and the American Kennel Club recognized the official breed in 1903.


The name "chow" may come from the Cantonese word for edible, and these dogs might have actually been a source of food in ancient China. However, the British expression "chow chow" (describing odds and ends transported on cargo ships) could have also been the inspiration for the breed's name. 041b061a72


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